Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 36

Kelly Link et al.

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2 x 18. 3 x 12. 4 x 9. 6 x 6. There are many ways to look at or approach the number 36. It is a square and therefore seemingly as far from a prime number as it is possible to get. (37 is a prime: so the previous statement sounds interesting, but is wrong.) There are not 36 short short stories within. But there are at least 2 poems although they are not 18 pages each.

There is a cover from kAt Philbin.

There are stories of possibly eerie encounters; stories of regrettable encounters; stories that do not hold a single encounter, except the imminent encounter between you, the reader, and the writer who is somewhere other in space and now retreating further in time each day. And if the enchantment of fiction — and poetry and nonfiction — works as planned, that magic will take someone’s thought that has been encapsulated in words, those words that were encased by ink, that ink that was pinned to paper, and then maybe, just maybe, that magic will be enacted upon you by the act of reading and you will take into your synapses, the space between your synapses, something of what that far distant writer hoped to impart in these words.

Table of Contents

Fiction

Gabriela Santiago, “Children of Air”
Lily Davenport, “The Crane Alphabet”
T. L. Rodebaugh, “The Secret History of the Original Line”
Mollie Chandler, “Evidence of a Storm”
Todd Summar, “Watching You Without Me”
Laurel Lathrop, “Cunning”
Christi Nogle, “The Best of Our Past, the Worst of Our Future”
Zhao Haihong, “Windhorse”

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, “How to Cook (Dis)Comfort Food”

Poetry

D M Gordon, Two Poems

About these Authors

Mollie Chandler is soon to complete her MFA in poetry at Lesley University, where she also concentrates in fantasy, fairy tale, and pedagogy. She works in Boston as an editorial assistant at an educational publishing company. Off the clock, she studies jazz vocals and acting, haunts thrift stores, and hunts for the best diners in New England. Her work can be found or is forthcoming in Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, The Charles River Journal, Light: a Journal of Photography and Poetry, Paradise in Limbo, Poems2Go, and others.

L. M. Davenport is a first-year MFA candidate at the University of Alabama. She has read Ursula Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness a ridiculous number of times, and once knitted a five-and-a-half-foot-long giant squid. Her work has previously appeared at Hobart, Shimmer, and Luna Station Quarterly.

D M Gordon is the author of Fourth World and Nightly, at the Institute of the Possible, a finalist for the Massachusetts Book Award and International Book Award. Gordon’s poems and stories have been published widely. Prizes include First Prize from Glimmer Train, and Editor’s Choice Awards from the Beacon Street Review and descant. An MCC Artist Fellow in fiction for a portion of her novel Geography, as well as a two time finalist in poetry, she’s a freelance editor in multiple genres, and the editor for Hedgerow Books.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her wife, Dawn Kimberling. She is a professional cook and amateur life coach. Her first novel, Turnskin, won the Lambda Literary Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. She is also the author of the Bellingham Mystery Series.

Laurel Lathrop is studying fiction in the Creative Writing PhD program at Florida State University, where she has been awarded a Legacy Fellowship. She teaches composition and works as Assistant Nonfiction Editor of the Southeast Review.

Christi Nogle teaches college writing in Boise, Idaho. She has published in CDM recording studio’s Portable Story Series and the Pseudopod podcast and has a story forthcoming in C. M. Muller’s literary horror anthology Nightscript III.

T. L. Rodebaugh is a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. He lives with his wife and two children. When not conducting psychological research or writing fiction, he enjoys being barely competent in playing the guitar and gardening. Although he has published widely in the field of psychology, this is his first published short story. You can find him on twitter.

Gabriela Santiago grew up in Illinois, Florida, Montana, and Yokosuka, Japan; these days she lives in St. Paul, where she spends her days professionally playing with kids at the Minnesota Children’s Museum. She is a graduate of Macalester College and the Clarion writing workshop, as well as a proud member of Team Tiny Bonesaw. Her fiction has appeared in People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction!, People of Colo(u)r Destroy Horror!, Betwixt, Black Candies—Surveillance: A Journal of Literary Horror, and States of Terror; her Black Candies story is also available in audio form on the GlitterShip podcast. You can find her online on Tumblr or Twitter.

Todd Summar writes fiction and essays, and serves as an editor for publishers and individuals. His work has appeared in Literary Hub, PANK, and Electric Literature, among others. He is the founding editor of Goreyesque and has an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia College Chicago. You can learn more about him on toddsummar.com or ToddSummar.

About

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 36 Early Autumn 2017. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731395. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · smallbeerpress@gmail.com · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com), 21 Conz St., Northampton, MA 01060. 413-585-0414. SPaper subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com &c. Contents © 2017 the authors. Cover illustration “I Was Raised by the Forest” ©2017 by kAt Philbin (katphilbin.com). All rights reserved. Thank you, lovely authors and artists. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women and writers of color), guideline requests, playlists, &c. to the address above. Peace.

 

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